Trifextra Haiku

For Trifextra 83.

In the event anyone noticed I deleted my first entry. It just didn’t sit well with me. 

We are tasked with writing a haiku this weekend. 

HAIKU (noun) : an unrhymed verse form of Japanese origin having three lines containing usually five, seven, and five syllables respectively

One of my favorite Twitter friends is a writer of haiku. If you are at all interested in the form follow her @lordfanny1723. She is awesome: very smart and often sassy. She writes only 5-7-5 haiku, which is not a hard and fast rule for the form, as I’m sure lovers of haiku contributing this weekend will remark on. However, read her. You will be inspired. I would also say the same about Bjorn @brudberg and Pirate @pirategunn. Got to give credit where it’s due!

Staying with the 5-7-5 syllable count our editors have suggested, here is my offering.

f919dc75c6172530e6a453672aef840a

in the mimosa

the tree and not the cocktail

a hummingbird sips

Thanks for reading!

Advertisements

35 thoughts on “Trifextra Haiku

    • Those that sip from the mimosa in my backyard often seem drunk to me the way they dart and fight each other off. And it is a sight for sore eyes. It makes me laugh. 🙂

  1. Hilarious imagery……..intoxicated hummingbirds! On the other hand, lovely imagery with the mimosa, which is so beautiful. Great job, Steph on the haiku and for tippng the hat toward Bjorn and Pirate ( and your Twitter friend) for their prowess in all forms of haiku and for their work in promoting it as such a vibrant and rich form of poetry.

  2. I LOVED this. And not because I love hummingbirds, which I could watch all day because they are so fascinating. The second line is such wonderful humor. Beautiful piece!

    • Thanks for the capital letters, Gina. I often find myself in a trance watching their movements far longer than I should, or think I should. Surely I could be more productive. But, at least I created a haiku out of it. Thanks for the nice comment!

    • Me too, Elaine. It seemed a good fit. I watch them out my window at the mimosa, and I can’t help thinking they become a bit intoxicated by the awesome number of blooms that linger in the summer for about 2 months.

Imagine...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s